A path to the woods filled by fresh rain water near the village of Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Sukholuchchya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A man is seen sitting on a chair in front of a decorative wallpaper in the living room of his house in the village of Medvin, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Medvin is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A man cuts the grass with a scythe in the village of Hornostaipil, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Hornostaipil is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A man prepares a picnic on the banks of the Kiev reservoir in the village of Strakholissya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Strakholissya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A boy jumps into the water of the Kiev reservoir in the village of Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Sukholuchchya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A family at lunch in their dacha in the village of Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The village of Sukholuchchya located on the banks of the Kiev reservoir in which the contaminated water from the river Pripiat spills, has seen in recent years an influx of Kiev residents coming back to spend holidays in their dachas.

A boy eats a soup in the backyard of his parents' dacha in the village of  Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The village of Sukholuchchya located on the banks of the Kiev reservoir in which the contaminated water from the river Pripiat spills, has seen in recent years an influx of Kiev residents coming back to spend holidays in their dachas.

A child's bedroom in a dacha in the village of Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The village of Sukholuchchya located on the banks of the Kiev reservoir in which the contaminated water from the river Pripiat spills, has seen in recent years an influx of Kiev residents coming back to spend holidays in their dachas.

A multiple exposure pictures shows a man bathing at the Kiev reservoir in the village of Strakholissya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Strakholissya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

Women are having a picnic in a public garden in the village of Hornostaipil, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Hornostaipil is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

Boys fish at the Kiev reservoir in the village of Strakholissya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Strakholissya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A girl holds her brother on her bike at a bus shelter in the village of Strakholissya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Strakholissya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A man dressed in Sunday suits walks to the church in the village of Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Sukholuchchya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

People enjoy warm weather during spring season on the banks of the Kiev reservoir in the village of Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Sukholuchchya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

People enjoy warm weather during spring season on the banks of the Kiev reservoir in the village of Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Sukholuchchya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A boy plays with a ball in the backyard of his parents' dacha in the village of  Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The village of Sukholuchchya located on the banks of the Kiev reservoir in which the contaminated water from the river Pripiat spills, has seen in recent years an influx of Kiev residents coming back to spend holidays in their dachas.

A dacha is seen in the village of  Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The village of Sukholuchchya located on the banks of the Kiev reservoir in which the contaminated water from the river Pripiat spills, has seen in recent years an influx of Kiev residents coming back to spend holidays in their dachas.

A girl waters the flowers in the backyard of her parents' dacha in the village of  Sukholuchchya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The village of Sukholuchchya located on the banks of the Kiev reservoir in which the contaminated water from the river Pripiat spills, has seen in recent years an influx of Kiev residents coming back to spend holidays in their dachas.

Men plow their fields where they grow vegetables in front of a luxury dacha in the village of Strakholissya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Strakholissya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A girl suffering from malformation probably caused by the effect of radiations walks outside her house  in the village of Strakholissya, Ukraine on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Strakholissya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

A rock sign dating from the Soviet Era is seen on a national road indicating the entrance of the Chernobyl Raion in the north of Kiev Ukraine on June 2012 on June 2012. After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the USSR military established an area of 30 km radius from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant designated for evacuation and placed under military control. The small village of Sukholuchchya is one of those villages situated just a hundred meters away from the exclusion zone and where levels of radioactive caesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium isotopes still pollute the ground and therefore the food and water but many chose to stay and live there.

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